Arizona woman to be executed for keeping a 10-year old cousin in a box storage

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Sammantha Allen has been sentenced to death in the US following her action. A verdict was issued on the 29-year-old Arizona woman who was found guilty in June of first-degree murder and four count charges of child abuse. Allen punished Ame Deal to death in 2011 for pilfering ice pop.

When the verdict was reached, Allen grabbed her head, cried and embraced her attorney before she was taken out of the courtroom.

In a statement by Juror Anne Schaad, CBS affiliate KPHO-TV was told that absence of remorse was the key thing that happened, and Allen never displayed remorse throughout the whole time.

Allen marks the 55th female sentenced to die in the nation

Allen will be the 55th woman condemned to death in the country. In Arizona, there are other two women on the death row. Arizona stands out as one o the states fighting to purchase execution drugs after medical firms stopped the use of their goods in lethal injections.
According to the report by NAACP on April – useful to the Death Penalty Information Center- about 2,800 men are on the death row.

Allen’s culminated history of abuse

Back to Allen’s matter, the authorities stated that Allen and her husband caused Ame to enter the box where she died after about six to seven hours. Some relatives blamed Allen for her history of abuse which she did again. Ame was made to crush aluminum cans with the bare foot, feed on dog feces, eat hot sauce and forced into the storage box on some occasions. According to investigators, she was often hit with the wooden paddle, kicked in the face and thrown in the pool.

Adults who lived at the house earlier said that Ame hid when playing hide and seek, and wasn’t seen until many hours later. Other three relatives are in prison for abusing Ame.

On the 29th of October, John Allen, Sammantha’s husband will be tried. Likewise, Sammantha’s mother, Cynthia Stoltzmann is serving a jail term of 24 years for convicting child abuse. Cynthia was Ame’s official guardian before the incident.

However, the child welfare powers in Arizona stated that they never got any child abuse report before the death of Ame. On the other hand, the child welfare authorities from Utah, where the family resided previously before moving over to Phoenix said that Ame was an abused child, police stated.

The legal decision follows the stoppage of executions in Arizona. This was because of the death of a 2014 prisoner who was fed with 15 doses of two drug mixtures, which his lawyer addressed as botched execution.

Earlier this summer, a lawsuit was settled – it challenged the manner Arizona goes about its death sentence. As such, the state can now start up executions again.